[Guest Post] Guilty Pleasures: I Secretly Love It When


Hi! I’m excited to be here today on Fay’s blog! We decided on the topic of Bookish Guilty Pleasures…which is such a fun topic! To be honest, I don’t think I have a lot of “guilty” pleasures because I don’t really feel guilty for what I do or don’t like. But I do have likes that feel mostly unique to me, so that’s what I’m going to talk about. Let’s just get to it, shall we?


I Secretly Love It When…

…there’s awkward romantic tension.
ROMANTIC TENSION IS MY FAVORITE. Is that so weird of me? By “romantic tension,” I mean those in between moments of “will they, won’t they?” Of knowing they both like each other, but nothing has happened yet. The awkwardness. The cuteness. Bah, it kills me every time. Prime example: Ben and Leslie from Parks and Rec.

…there’s a nerdy, awkward love interest.
This isn’t going to be all about awkwardness, I promise. But I love it. There’s enough buff, charming, could-get-all-the-ladies-but-he-chooses-this-one type of guys in YA literature. So when I find nerdy, awkward ones that I sincerely love and want to get together with the other MC…I love it. His awkwardness just shows that he cares. Prime example: Max from The Start of Me and You by Emery Lord.

…there’s a character completely different from me.
Of course I love it when I can relate to a character a lot (aka Paige from The Start of Me and You), but there’s something to be said about characters that are so completely different from you. They still need to build that sense of empathy otherwise a connection can’t be made…but I love books that can take me a place I’ve never been before and help me experience a way of thinking I never would have on my own. I’ve just seen a lot of people not like a book because they couldn’t relate to the main character at all, but isn’t that kind of cool in and of itself? Prime example: Jaycee from You Were Here by Cori McCarthy

…there are pop culture references.
I’m pretty sure most authors try to avoid these because it places a time on a book they hope to be timeless. I get that. But sometimes pop culture references are so fun to catch in novels. That’s one of the reasons why I’m excited for the new season of Gilmore Girls; the original had so many pop culture references I didn’t know…but this new one I’ll be able to understand a little better! They’re usually subtle, but they’re sometimes fun to catch. Prime example (because I already talked about it): Gilmore Girls.

…the movie adaptation is different than the book.
Not so different that the storyline is unrecognizable and ruined. But I just know and appreciate that the movie should be a completely different experience than reading. It’s so much more visual, so I appreciate when things change to accentuate that. Does that make sense? I just see a movie as the director and screenwriter’s interpretation of that book. When it becomes a movie, it’s as much their story as it is the author’s. So—within reason—shouldn’t they have room to play? Prime example: The Maze Runner by James Dashner

Those are all of the ones I can come up with right now, but I had more than I thought I would in the beginning! Thanks again, Fay, for having me.


Carlisa (Confessions of Carlisa)

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